Emma Hutchinson

Migration and Conflict Research Coordinator (2019-20).

As a natural phenomenon, humans have been migrating since the start of history, but the flow, the pattern and the reasons are continuously changing. At the core of migration is a search for opportunities — whilst for some the choices are nearly unlimited, others find themselves faced with only a few options, perhaps even only one. A common starting point for many migration journeys is conflict. However, this does not necessarily mean conflict in the sense of armed conflict. A conflict of ideas or values, over territory or resources, or with institutions, policies, cultures or the changing environment can all push people to leave their homes. Of course, these factors can overlap as well.

This year, the Migration and Conflict Team will explore a diverse spread of topics that tie back to these two key words and in the process challenge or develop existing ideas and cultivate new contributions. Whilst developing pertinent policy research in response to challenges within migration, we are also strongly conscious that not all migration is problematic and that the narrative must not be tinted in one shade. The world today is complex, migration is complex and we are here to produce carefully researched reports that will progress public understanding of this topic.

Publications

Why Regional Solidarity Is Not Enough: The Need for a Sustainable Solution to the Venezuelan Refugee Exodus.

The Venezuelan refugee crisis has impacted the majority of countries in Latin America. There have been attempts at having a unified and sustainable regional response, but the outcomes have been deficient. Further, the policies and strategies implemented thus far have focused on the short-term results. Accordingly, this paper will explore the regional responses that have been proposed and analyze the challenges of having a robust long-term response.

By: Alissa Renee Mustre Del Rio

Published on: December 25, 2019

Why Regional Solidarity Is Not Enough: The Need for a Sustainable Solution to the Venezuelan Refugee Exodus.

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Time for Change: Rethinking the European Union Refugee Policy in Lebanon

The European Union (EU) has increased its cooperation on the management of the refugee influx with the Lebanese government and has been the leading donor in Lebanon in the context of Syrians’ displacement. In its turn, the Lebanese government has indirectly delegated key responsibilities in refugee protection and assistance to supranational organizations. Despite the fact that this approach has boosted cooperation between the Lebanese government and various international actors, several dilemmas emerged in this regard. The outcomes that were present on the ground showed a deficiency in the externalization policy that has been adopted by the European Union and other international actors.

By: Josiane Matar

Published on: January 29,2020

Time For Change: Rethinking the European Union Refugee Policy in Lebanon

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Post-Crisis Policy: Proposals for Comprehensive EU Asylum Reform

The 2015 refugee humanitarian crisis and the policy responses of the European Union (EU) illuminate the pressing need for a comprehensive approach to forced migration into Europe. The policy responses of the EU and member states undermine many of the foundations upon which the Union was built: Solidarity among member states and adherence to human rights protection and dignity. The present-day policies are largely a result of restrictive and piecemeal practices counteracting the strength of the EU that lies precisely in these foundational tenets.

By: Brandon Green

Published on: February 16,2020

Post-Crisis Policy: Proposals for Comprehensive EU Asylum Reform

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Migration and Economic Development: Impacts of Remittances on Sending Countries

Migration has steadily increased, bringing radical changes to society, moving beyond local and national borders and becoming global. According to the International Migration Report 2020, the worldwide number of international migrants (including refugees) is 272 million, of which nearly two-thirds are labour migrants. The migration process has brought enormous changes to our societies, within both the countries of origin (native country of the migrant) and destination (country where the migrant resides). In this discussion concerning labour migration and development, the role of remittances is an often-highlighted topic.


By: Mohammed Ameen Arimbra

Published on: March 8, 2020

Migration and Economic Development: Impacts of Remittances on Sending Countries


How to Build an Inivisible Empire: The Vast Overseas Chinese Network that Knows No Borders

In their own unique way, Chinese ethnic diasporas function as their own authentic forms of globalization. The ebbs and flows of Chinese migration over the centuries have culminated in the creation of a vast, global network of overseas Chinese. Entangled within this global network of overseas Chinese are the Hakka people. Hakka minority groups can be found globally and have recently experienced a resurgence in certain areas of South East Asia, particularly in Thailand. It has been largely problematic that the legitimacy of ethnic variation and diversity that exists within the Sino-Thai diaspora has been unrecognized by mainstream Thai society.

By: Eiza Marot

Published on: March 29, 2020

How to Build an Inivisible Empire: The Vast Overseas Chinese Network that Knows No Borders